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Discipline? Behavior might actually be what you’re after.

Behavior, Not Discipline. Dr. Mark Wilson asks you to think about “discipline” in a different, more productive way. We use the term “discipline” at school when we more often mean “behavior.”
Changing Behavior, according to authors Chip and Dan Heath, is harder than you might think. In fact, changing behavior (or making progress as we often look at it in school) is fundamentally an incremental process. Give it a watch to see why.
Want to have a conversation with your team as a follow-up to the incredible webcast featuring Dr. Latrisha Chattin and Cicely Lewis?  Here are eight brief clips from the full session with questions that you can use to drive your conversations.  

The questions:

1)  Listen to what Cicely Lewis is leading at Meadowcreek HS (and actually all over the world!).  What are the efforts regarding equity that are happening in your classroom and your school? 

2)  Visible Equity.  Please watch the clip from Cicely.  Who is reading at your school?  Who isn't?  What are you doing to increase reading among all of your students?  Dr. Peters frequently says that literacy is the antidote to poverty.

3)  Watch the clip, listening to Cicely discuss how the conditions have been developed for the equity work at Meadowcreek.  Now, discuss "the principal's touch" of school culture.  How effectively does your school culture support efforts for equity for all? 

4)  Please watch the clip and listen to how Latrisha seeks representation in the curriculum.  How are you doing with this?  How might you do better?  How do students feel when they rarely see people who look like them in the books they read or the history they learn? 

5)  Equity and Social Justice in the curriculum can be an active-learning environment.  Listen to Latrisha discuss what they do at Susie King Taylor Community School.  What are you doing that's similar?  What might you do? 

6)  When you're doing equity work, you'll gain some supporters as Latrisha shares in the clip.  You'll also find some opposition.  How do you move forward working for all children in the face of both? 

7)  This clip has Cicely and Latrisha sharing courses that students take at Meadowcreek HS and at Susie King Taylor Community School.  What do you offer for your students for ethics, equity, social justice and civic responsibility?  How effective is it?  

8)  Last clip.  Please watch the entire webinar at this YouTube Channel when you're able, because we really could have had fifty clips for discussion, but we stopped here.  Please watch clip eight and listen to Cicely's story of the Laundromat Library.  It's not only a story of equity in that it exists at all in a place that provides access, but it goes even further in providing books that reach the readers with a variety of subjects that the children can identify themselves in.  What's your one idea in the name of equity that you can make a step forward for students in your school and community? 

Thanks for checking this out.  It's designed to jumpstart you right into conversations about equity at your school. 

For more information, please visit school-leader.com  and principal-matters.com 

Thanks!  Mark

Want to have a conversation with your team as a follow-up to the incredible webcast featuring Dr. Latrisha Chattin and Cicely Lewis? Here are eight brief clips from the full session with questions that you can use to drive your conversations.

The questions:

1) Listen to what Cicely Lewis is leading at Meadowcreek HS (and actually all over the world!). What are the efforts regarding equity that are happening in your classroom and your school?

2) Visible Equity. Please watch the clip from Cicely. Who is reading at your school? Who isn't? What are you doing to increase reading among all of your students? Dr. Peters frequently says that literacy is the antidote to poverty.

3) Watch the clip, listening to Cicely discuss how the conditions have been developed for the equity work at Meadowcreek. Now, discuss "the principal's touch" of school culture. How effectively does your school culture support efforts for equity for all?

4) Please watch the clip and listen to how Latrisha seeks representation in the curriculum. How are you doing with this? How might you do better? How do students feel when they rarely see people who look like them in the books they read or the history they learn?

5) Equity and Social Justice in the curriculum can be an active-learning environment. Listen to Latrisha discuss what they do at Susie King Taylor Community School. What are you doing that's similar? What might you do?

6) When you're doing equity work, you'll gain some supporters as Latrisha shares in the clip. You'll also find some opposition. How do you move forward working for all children in the face of both?

7) This clip has Cicely and Latrisha sharing courses that students take at Meadowcreek HS and at Susie King Taylor Community School. What do you offer for your students for ethics, equity, social justice and civic responsibility? How effective is it?

8) Last clip. Please watch the entire webinar at this YouTube Channel when you're able, because we really could have had fifty clips for discussion, but we stopped here. Please watch clip eight and listen to Cicely's story of the Laundromat Library. It's not only a story of equity in that it exists at all in a place that provides access, but it goes even further in providing books that reach the readers with a variety of subjects that the children can identify themselves in. What's your one idea in the name of equity that you can make a step forward for students in your school and community?

Thanks for checking this out. It's designed to jumpstart you right into conversations about equity at your school.

For more information, please visit school-leader.com and principal-matters.com

Thanks! Mark

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YouTube Video VVVzMFlld2pyWUpfOTluUFJkTWJGa1ZRLmJ6MGUyZGlyTU13

Equity and Excellence: Clips from April 13, 2021

Mark Wilson 27 views April 18, 2021 9:36 pm

What a session!  If you want to see passion for education and hear examples of how to bring learning alive, you'll want to watch this powerful session featuring Dr. Latrisha Chattin, Director  of the Susie King Taylor Community School in Savannah, GA and Cicely Lewis, Media Specialist at Meadowcreek High School in Gwinnett County Schools, GA.  

Dr. Chattin's school is built intentionally to study equity and social justice and these ideals are in the forefront of the curriculum at SKTCS.   Cicely Lewis was named the 2020 National School Librarian of the Year and is the founder of "Read Woke", an international effort to increase readership of books written by and for all children. 

Your regular hosts, Dr. Stephen Peters ("The Peters Group") and Dr. Mark Wilson ("The Leadership School") bring you this session, presented by Albany State University's Educational Leadership Program (Dr. Janis Carthon, Department Head) and The Wallace Foundation (Debbie Daniels).  

In this session, we explore five questions with Latrisha and Cicely:
1.  Tell us about what you're doing in your school (and in your library and beyond, Cicely) that is focused on equity?
2 .  How are you incorporating lessons on equity and social justice within your curriculum, or the programs of your school?
3.  What have you learned from your efforts that might support someone getting started in merging equity work into the curriculum? 
4.  What do you feel most proud about in this work?  What have you done that seemed to connect with students and perhaps make a difference? 
5.  Both of you have reached a level of success in your work.  Does it take a "unicorn" like you to merge equity and social justice work into the curriculum?

For more information, please visit principal-matters.com and school-leader.com

What a session! If you want to see passion for education and hear examples of how to bring learning alive, you'll want to watch this powerful session featuring Dr. Latrisha Chattin, Director of the Susie King Taylor Community School in Savannah, GA and Cicely Lewis, Media Specialist at Meadowcreek High School in Gwinnett County Schools, GA.

Dr. Chattin's school is built intentionally to study equity and social justice and these ideals are in the forefront of the curriculum at SKTCS. Cicely Lewis was named the 2020 National School Librarian of the Year and is the founder of "Read Woke", an international effort to increase readership of books written by and for all children.

Your regular hosts, Dr. Stephen Peters ("The Peters Group") and Dr. Mark Wilson ("The Leadership School") bring you this session, presented by Albany State University's Educational Leadership Program (Dr. Janis Carthon, Department Head) and The Wallace Foundation (Debbie Daniels).

In this session, we explore five questions with Latrisha and Cicely:
1. Tell us about what you're doing in your school (and in your library and beyond, Cicely) that is focused on equity?
2 . How are you incorporating lessons on equity and social justice within your curriculum, or the programs of your school?
3. What have you learned from your efforts that might support someone getting started in merging equity work into the curriculum?
4. What do you feel most proud about in this work? What have you done that seemed to connect with students and perhaps make a difference?
5. Both of you have reached a level of success in your work. Does it take a "unicorn" like you to merge equity and social justice work into the curriculum?

For more information, please visit principal-matters.com and school-leader.com

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YouTube Video VVVzMFlld2pyWUpfOTluUFJkTWJGa1ZRLkJIbnNRRWJuTzNF

Equity and Excellence in Our Schools: Latrisha Chattin and Cicely Lewis

Mark Wilson 59 views April 14, 2021 9:05 am

On March 16, we had an exceptional session on Equity and Excellence with Superintendents Dr. Baron Davis (Richland District Two, Columbia, SC) and Dr. Mike Duncan (Pike County, GA).  

From the session, we've pulled out some highlights and put them together in this reel for you and your team or faculty to use as conversation starters in your own exploration of equity and excellence in your school and system. 

Here are the segments you'll find in the video and some questions to get you started:

Segment One:  Defining Equity.   Watch the first clip and reflect on Dr. Davis' statement:  before we could work on equity, we needed to define it, and we define it as every student receives the opportunities and supports he/she needs to maximize his/her gifts and talents as they pursue their pathway to purpose.  In what ways do you agree with Dr. Davis?  In what ways do you do those things with/for students in your school/system?  In what ways do you need to do differently to live up to that definition? 

Segment Two:  The Need for Equity Policies.  Does your school/system have an equity policy?  Watch the segment.  In what ways did having an equity policy begin to improve conditions for students? 

Segment Three:  "How Are The Children?"  This powerful segment explores the idea of collective care and responsibility.  In what ways does your school/system exemplify the idea of 'the children' and their well-being existing as a priority?  In what ways would that mindset make your school/system different? 

Segment Four:  From Knowing to Doing   Dr. Duncan shares the idea that many students in poverty are terrific problem solvers and benefit when school is based on doing rather than knowing.  He warns that shift won't make everyone happy.  Is your school/system a place of knowing, or a place of doing?  How do you move it in such a way that it meets your students where they are?

Segment Five:  The Courage to Lead.  Dr. Peters poses this question... how do you find the courage to lead your school/system towards a more equitable existence?  Watch the video... this part is longer than most segments because, it's so rich in thoughts there wasn't a good place to cut!  After you watch the video, reflect on your school/system.  What must you do to have the courage to lead?  Where might you gain that courage?  With whom can you work to make it less daunting?

Segment Six:  What Are the First Steps?  Rotonya Rhodes from Greene County GA posed the question during the live session, what are the first steps towards leading a school/system of equity.  Watch the video.  Listen to Dr. Davis challenge all of us as he says "you first have to check your own heart."  How is yours?  In what ways do you need to change the way you think?  How deeply are you committed to equity?  Finally, Dr. Davis reminds you that many see equity as something that results in them having something taken away from them.  That mindset is tough to battle, but he shares encouragement, but a reminder that equity work will probably leave some bruises.  Are you ready for this work?  With whom can you partner to better engage in this work?  

For more resources,  visit principal-matters.com

This series is possible through a partnership with Albany State University's College of Education, Dr. Janis Carthon, Interim Dean, and through The Wallace Foundation's support of schools and school leaders..

On March 16, we had an exceptional session on Equity and Excellence with Superintendents Dr. Baron Davis (Richland District Two, Columbia, SC) and Dr. Mike Duncan (Pike County, GA).

From the session, we've pulled out some highlights and put them together in this reel for you and your team or faculty to use as conversation starters in your own exploration of equity and excellence in your school and system.

Here are the segments you'll find in the video and some questions to get you started:

Segment One: Defining Equity. Watch the first clip and reflect on Dr. Davis' statement: before we could work on equity, we needed to define it, and we define it as every student receives the opportunities and supports he/she needs to maximize his/her gifts and talents as they pursue their pathway to purpose. In what ways do you agree with Dr. Davis? In what ways do you do those things with/for students in your school/system? In what ways do you need to do differently to live up to that definition?

Segment Two: The Need for Equity Policies. Does your school/system have an equity policy? Watch the segment. In what ways did having an equity policy begin to improve conditions for students?

Segment Three: "How Are The Children?" This powerful segment explores the idea of collective care and responsibility. In what ways does your school/system exemplify the idea of 'the children' and their well-being existing as a priority? In what ways would that mindset make your school/system different?

Segment Four: From Knowing to Doing Dr. Duncan shares the idea that many students in poverty are terrific problem solvers and benefit when school is based on doing rather than knowing. He warns that shift won't make everyone happy. Is your school/system a place of knowing, or a place of doing? How do you move it in such a way that it meets your students where they are?

Segment Five: The Courage to Lead. Dr. Peters poses this question... how do you find the courage to lead your school/system towards a more equitable existence? Watch the video... this part is longer than most segments because, it's so rich in thoughts there wasn't a good place to cut! After you watch the video, reflect on your school/system. What must you do to have the courage to lead? Where might you gain that courage? With whom can you work to make it less daunting?

Segment Six: What Are the First Steps? Rotonya Rhodes from Greene County GA posed the question during the live session, what are the first steps towards leading a school/system of equity. Watch the video. Listen to Dr. Davis challenge all of us as he says "you first have to check your own heart." How is yours? In what ways do you need to change the way you think? How deeply are you committed to equity? Finally, Dr. Davis reminds you that many see equity as something that results in them having something taken away from them. That mindset is tough to battle, but he shares encouragement, but a reminder that equity work will probably leave some bruises. Are you ready for this work? With whom can you partner to better engage in this work?

For more resources, visit principal-matters.com

This series is possible through a partnership with Albany State University's College of Education, Dr. Janis Carthon, Interim Dean, and through The Wallace Foundation's support of schools and school leaders..

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YouTube Video VVVzMFlld2pyWUpfOTluUFJkTWJGa1ZRLlhlS3U3OWJZRUJB

Equity Study: Questions for Your Continued Growth

Mark Wilson 49 views March 22, 2021 1:38 pm


Stress and the School Leader

School leaders have stressful jobs. But what does stress do to your brain? This short video shows you what happens and why you need to develop coping techniques to best manage your stress.
Stress is Real!… and you can do something about it. Coach Anne Stamps shares the hidden secret of breathing.